Potato Roses

Here I’ll show you the most delicious way to make potato roses!

In answer to your question – no, there truly is no way I won’t serve a potato 🤣 But c’mon, look how pretty they are!! They also taste delicious and are so simple to make. Follow me…

close up shot of potato roses in muffin tray fresh out the oven

Slicing the potatoes

Funnily enough, this is the first recipe I’ve ever uploaded that I’ve used a mandoline for. I usually like to test my knife skills, but these require very thin and uniformly sliced potatoes.

What kind of potatoes should I use?

Any kind of baking potato works great. No need to peel them, but I recommend slicing off the ends (they’ll be too difficult to roll up).

Drying the potatoes

Once you’ve sliced the potatoes, I recommend patting them dry as best you can. Once you season them with salt they’ll start to produce water, which unfortunately is unavoidable, so removing excess moisture beforehand is a good idea.

Potato Rose Seasoning

In reality, you can season these however you fancy, but I love the combination of garlic, rosemary and parmesan! You want to finely grate the garlic into a paste and very finely dice the rosemary, just so the slices get as best coverage as possible.

Process shots: slice potatoes into bowl (photos 1&2), pat dry (photo 3), mix in seasoning (photo 4).

4 step by step photos showing how to slice potato roses

Making Potato Roses

Making the roses is pretty straightforward. You’ll just overlap the slices by about 3/4 and tightly roll them up. It’s a little fiddly at the start, but you’ll get the swing of things. They don’t have to look perfect, so long as they’re properly rolled up.

Using Bacon

This is mainly used to keep the roses intact, although it does obviously add flavour. I initially tried rolling it up with the slices (i.e. the slices on top of the bacon) but found the bacon in the centre of the roses was chewy and essentially poached in the moisture from the potatoes. I find the bacon more useful as a ‘string’ around the outside.

Using Parmesan

I use this not only to add a boost of flavour, but also to help ‘glue’ the petals together so the rose doesn’t fall apart in the oven. I find the fresh dusty variety works best, but you can finely grate it if you’d prefer.

Baking the roses

First of all, make sure you properly grease the muffin tin, as they do tend to stick a little. I initially bake them uncovered to allow unwanted moisture to escape, then I add foil to cook them without the petals burning.

Process shots: lay out potatoes and top with parmesan (photo 1), roll up (photo 2), wrap in bacon (photo 3), add to muffin tin (photo 4).

4 step by step photos showing how to make potato roses

Potato Roses FAQ

Do I have to add bacon?

I have tried them without and they don’t stay together quite as well. Still a valiant effort though, so it’s not a deal-breaker. I haven’t tried it myself, but you could loosely tie them in kitchen twine!

Do I have to add Parmesan?

This is arguably more important than the bacon, as it works as the glue. I have tried these with Cheddar, which works pretty well.

How do I know when they’re cooked?

They’ll be lightly charred around the edges and knife-tender right the way through. You can take them out during cooking to check with a sharp knife.

How do I prevent them from burning?

The foil will help prevent this, but if you find they’re browning too quickly then just lower the heat slightly and tighten up the foil.

close up overhead shot of potato roses in muffin tray fresh out the oven

Serving Potato Roses

I recommend using a spoon to carefully lift them from the muffin tin. I then immediately soak the muffin tin in water because there’s usually some char left in the holes.

You can serve with an extra dusting of parmesan if you fancy, or even some fresh parsley! These are so great as a Side Dish to a Hearty Dinner or Date Night Dinner!

Alrighty, let’s tuck into the full recipe for these potato roses shall we?!

potato roses on small white plate with rosemary

How to make Potato Roses (Full Recipe & Video)

potato roses on small white plate with rosemary

Print

Potato Roses

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Here I’ll show you the most delicious way to make potato roses!
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Universal
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Servings 6 roses
Calories 257kcal
Cost £1 / $1

Equipment

  • Sharp Knife & Chopping Board
  • Mandoline
  • Large Mixing Bowl
  • Kitchen Roll
  • Fine Cheese Grater
  • Muffin Tin
  • Aluminium Foil

Ingredients

  • 600g / 1.3lb Baking Potatoes
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Olive Oil, plus more to grease tray (or grease with butter/oil spray)
  • 1 tsp very finely diced Fresh Rosemary
  • 2 cloves of Garlic, finely grated
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Black Pepper
  • 60g / 2oz Parmesan (see notes)
  • 6 slices of Streaky Bacon

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 190C/375F. Generously grease 6 holes of a muffin tray.
  • Use a mandoline to thinly cut them into 2mm slices (discard the very ends of the potatoes). I recommend using a finger guard, at least when you get closer to the blade. Use kitchen roll to dry the slices as best you can.
  • Toss the slices in a large bowl with olive oil, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper until everything is well-distributed. Place 1/6th of the slices in a row, overlapping by around 2/3-3/4 of the previous slice (usually around 15 slices). Sprinkle 1/6th of the parmesan over the slices (around 1 tbsp) then place a slice of bacon next to them.
  • Roll up the potato slices then wrap them in the bacon. You might find it a little fiddly at first, but you’ll get the swing of it. They don’t have to look perfect, so long as they’re properly rolled up. Place in the muffin tray and gently fan out the petals so it looks like a rose. Repeat 5 more times to create 6 roses. Try and work quickly as the longer the slices sit the more watery they get. Not a huge issue as the moisture will evaporate in the oven, they’re just more difficult to work with.
  • Place the roses in the oven uncovered for 20 minutes. They won’t be cooked through at this point, but will start lightly browning on the edges. Take the tray out and tightly cover the roses with foil, then place back in the oven for 35-45 minutes, or until the potatoes are crisp and tender right the way through.
  • Use a spoon to carefully remove the roses from the tin then tuck in and enjoy!

Video

Notes

a) Slicing the potatoes – I highly recommend using a mandoline. It’s really important you get the slices nice and thin so they roll up with ease.

b) Parmesan – I use this not only to add a boost of flavour, but also to help ‘glue’ the petals together so the rose doesn’t fall apart in the oven. I find the fresh dusty variety works best, but you can finely grate it if you’d prefer.

c) Using bacon – This is mainly used to keep the roses intact, although it does obviously add flavour. I initially tried rolling it up with the slices (i.e the slices on top of the bacon) but found the bacon in the centre of the roses was chewy and essentially poached in the moisture from the potatoes. I find the bacon more useful as a ‘string’ around the outside.

d) Seasoning – You can really season these however you fancy! I just love rosemary and garlic. 

e) Cooking times – This will differ based on how your oven runs and how thick the roses end up. Don’t be scared to continue baking for longer if they’re still not cooked (consider dropping heat if they’re browning too much). Or if they’re struggling to brown at all you can remove the foil at the end.

f) Calories – Per rose.

Nutrition

Calories: 257kcal | Carbohydrates: 19.51g | Protein: 8.2g | Fat: 16.48g | Saturated Fat: 2.036g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.542g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3.186g | Trans Fat: 0.089g | Cholesterol: 9mg | Sodium: 503mg | Potassium: 577mg | Fiber: 2.3g | Sugar: 2.3g | Vitamin A: 104IU | Vitamin C: 20mg | Calcium: 101mg | Iron: 0.99mg

The post Potato Roses appeared first on Don’t Go Bacon My Heart.

Here I’ll show you the most delicious way to make potato roses! In answer to your question – no, there truly is no way I won’t serve a potato 🤣 But c’mon, look how pretty they are!! They also taste delicious and are so simple to make. Follow me… Slicing the potatoes Funnily enough, this…

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